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TIME FOR PLAY

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TIME FOR PLAY

Why architecture should take happiness seriously

Auteur:AZC – Atelier Zündel Cristea, Grégoire Zündel, Irina Cristean

Uitgever:ACTAR

ISBN: 978-1-940291-81-9

  • Paperback
  • Engels
  • 160 pagina's
  • 3 jun. 2016

Over the last 15 years AZC’s architectural work has developed through a diverse range of experiences. The book 'TIME FOR PLAY. Why architecture should take happiness seriously' presents a selextion of AZC's work: exhibition pavilions, temporary installations, and ideas competitions – a mix of built and un-built projects.

“Today’s situation promotes innovation, supports creativity and enriches projects, calling on our intelligence. We are forced to take a new look at practices and uses, to consider different ways of doing things, to think about the humanity of a place; and all this when we still find it so hard to understand community needs, and even more so to keep up with changing society. Faced with a changing world, they propose solutions that are novel in their shape, use, cost and temporality. This project is realistic and realisable. The architects put their intelligence and skill not into regurgitating conventional solutions but into inventing new ones. They have left behind the stagnant reproduction of the city and shapes of the 19th century, repetition of a past time, and moved on to building in response to our times. Is this modernity? Does this project mark a new era, as did Paris Plage in 2002, or the subsequent shifting developments along the Left Bank of the Seine?

Jean-Pierre Charbonneau – 2015

Over the last 15 years AZC’s architectural work has developed through a diverse range of experiences. The book 'TIME FOR PLAY. Why architecture should take happiness seriously' presents a selextion of AZC's work: exhibition pavilions, temporary installations, and ideas competitions – a mix of built and un-built projects.

“Today’s situation promotes innovation, supports creativity and enriches projects, calling on our intelligence. We are forced to take a new look at practices and uses, to consider different ways of doing things, to think about the humanity of a place; and all this when we still find it so hard to understand community needs, and even more so to keep up with changing society. Faced with a changing world, they propose solutions that are novel in their shape, use, cost and temporality. This project is realistic and realisable. The architects put their intelligence and skill not into regurgitating conventional solutions but into inventing new ones. They have left behind the stagnant reproduction of the city and shapes of the 19th century, repetition of a past time, and moved on to building in response to our times. Is this modernity? Does this project mark a new era, as did Paris Plage in 2002, or the subsequent shifting developments along the Left Bank of the Seine?

Jean-Pierre Charbonneau – 2015

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