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The Hackable City set. Cahier #1, #2 and #3 | Martijn de Waal, Michiel de Lange, Matthijs Bouw

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The Hackable City set

Cahier #1, #2 and #3

Auteur:Martijn de Waal, Michiel de Lange, Matthijs Bouw

Uitgever:The Hackable City

  • Paperback
  • Engels
  • 43 + 71 + 69 pagina's
  • 16 mrt. 2018

The Hackable City is a research project that explores the potential for new modes of collaborative citymaking, in a network society. This set consists of three cahiers on their various studies from around the (Western) world, describe and analyze new practices of collaborative citymaking.

Cahier #1 introduces our Hackable City-model and explains how it can be used to explore collaborative processes of citymaking in democratic societies. What new roles have emerged for citizens, (design) professionals and institutions, and how can collectives of citizens organized issues of communal concern interact with traditional institutions?

Cahier #2 describes a series of design probes that explored cooperative area development in the Amsterdam brownfield redevelopment site of Buiksloterham. These probes were tailored to investigate specific aspects of ‘hackable citymaking’: collaborative practices between different stakeholders, where new media technologies are employed to open up urban institutions and infrastructures to systemic change, in the public interest.

Cahier #3 explores a series of concrete hackable citymaking practices in Athens, São Paulo and Shenzhen.  Despite being situated on different continents and having distinct traditions and political systems, we found a number of dynamics around civic initiatives in these cities that further informed our Hackable city model.

The Hackable City is a research project that explores the potential for new modes of collaborative citymaking, in a network society. This set consists of three cahiers on their various studies from around the (Western) world, describe and analyze new practices of collaborative citymaking.

Cahier #1 introduces our Hackable City-model and explains how it can be used to explore collaborative processes of citymaking in democratic societies. What new roles have emerged for citizens, (design) professionals and institutions, and how can collectives of citizens organized issues of communal concern interact with traditional institutions?

Cahier #2 describes a series of design probes that explored cooperative area development in the Amsterdam brownfield redevelopment site of Buiksloterham. These probes were tailored to investigate specific aspects of ‘hackable citymaking’: collaborative practices between different stakeholders, where new media technologies are employed to open up urban institutions and infrastructures to systemic change, in the public interest.

Cahier #3 explores a series of concrete hackable citymaking practices in Athens, São Paulo and Shenzhen.  Despite being situated on different continents and having distinct traditions and political systems, we found a number of dynamics around civic initiatives in these cities that further informed our Hackable city model.

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