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a+u 616. 2022:01. Dwelling Studies and Japan's Women Architects | 9784900212732 | a+u magazine

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a+u 616. 2022:01. Dwelling Studies and Japan's Women Architects

Uitgever:a+u

  • Paperback
  • Engels, Japans
  • 176 pagina's
  • 3 jan. 2022

This issue of a+u magazine traces the extraordinary achievements by women architects in Japan and examines dwelling studies as a unique approach to the design of environments, centered upon daily living and relationships among people.

The field began as a curriculum on “clothing, food, and housing” in the Department of Home Economics at Japan Women’s University at the turn of the 20th century and has played a profound role in the education of women architects in Japan. Masako Hayashi, Nobuko Ogawa, Kazuyo Sejima, Satoko Shinohara, Kazuko Akamatsu are some of the representative figures.

Seven essays on these pages provide crucial historical documentation and insight into the early years of women architects making their mark in Japan. A graduate of the program and the issue’s guest editor Momoyo Kaijima defines dwelling studies as an open-ended approach to design that focuses on the exchange between designers and inhabitants to create spaces that embrace individuality. While dwelling studies was born within the unique institutional setting of Japan Women’s University in the midst of tumultuous social change, it has continued to enable the contemplation and realization of the contemporary.

This issue of a+u magazine traces the extraordinary achievements by women architects in Japan and examines dwelling studies as a unique approach to the design of environments, centered upon daily living and relationships among people.

The field began as a curriculum on “clothing, food, and housing” in the Department of Home Economics at Japan Women’s University at the turn of the 20th century and has played a profound role in the education of women architects in Japan. Masako Hayashi, Nobuko Ogawa, Kazuyo Sejima, Satoko Shinohara, Kazuko Akamatsu are some of the representative figures.

Seven essays on these pages provide crucial historical documentation and insight into the early years of women architects making their mark in Japan. A graduate of the program and the issue’s guest editor Momoyo Kaijima defines dwelling studies as an open-ended approach to design that focuses on the exchange between designers and inhabitants to create spaces that embrace individuality. While dwelling studies was born within the unique institutional setting of Japan Women’s University in the midst of tumultuous social change, it has continued to enable the contemplation and realization of the contemporary.

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