DEMYSTIFIED

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DEMYSTIFIED

The European Ceramic Workcentre as Centre of Excellence

Auteur:Nick Renshaw

Uitgever:Jap Sam Books

ISBN: 978-94-90322-71-7

  • Paperback
  • Engels
  • 300 pagina's
  • 13 mei 2017

The European Ceramic Workcentre (EKWC) is regarded widely as a world-leading organisation. A world-leader through its work as artist in residence centre where practice using the ceramic material is hosted, and a world-leader through its work as institution where the innovative use of this material in all areas of design and the visual arts is promoted. Though carrying an intrinsically global reach it is an institution rooted deeply in the very unique cultural history of the Netherlands, a fundamental factor in any discussion of its behaviour and one that is emphasised appropriately in this study.

The high regard with which the EKWC is appreciated is recognised throughout the wider visual arts, across borders as well as much further afield. By the thousands of individuals who have either already passed through its doors as temporary, invited or guest residents or by the many who remain eager to do so in future. By a wide range of related organisations, either other residence centres, art academies, individual ceramic studios, conference administrations, biennials or symposia that see the EKWC as the role model on which to base their own practice. And by theoreticians, critics, journalists and politicians who have each come to recognise the leading position of the EKWC and its lasting theoretical impact in countless articles, journals, reports, catalogues and all manner of other published material.

That the centre may be regarded so highly within just one of these groups would make it worthy of further attention. That it is acknowledged equally significantly across multiple fields makes it clearly a special case indeed. In keeping with an organisation so highly regarded an extensive degree of documentation exists which recognises the work undertaken by this centre. What though is apparent throughout this recognition is that it has remained by and large precisely that. A recognition of the Centre's standing rather than the offering of a clear understanding into the reasoning behind its success.

Demystified: The European Ceramic Workcentre as Centre of Excellence deciphers for the first time the specific and fundamental reasoning for the successes behind this world leader. It describes the complex system of operation that exists throughout the entire organisation, a system that has matured and been refined over the course of the previous four decades. It explains how such an ideal working environment has developed, why this is unique to the EKWC, and why such excellence in practice is difficult to find in other related organisations around the world.

The European Ceramic Workcentre (EKWC) is regarded widely as a world-leading organisation. A world-leader through its work as artist in residence centre where practice using the ceramic material is hosted, and a world-leader through its work as institution where the innovative use of this material in all areas of design and the visual arts is promoted. Though carrying an intrinsically global reach it is an institution rooted deeply in the very unique cultural history of the Netherlands, a fundamental factor in any discussion of its behaviour and one that is emphasised appropriately in this study.

The high regard with which the EKWC is appreciated is recognised throughout the wider visual arts, across borders as well as much further afield. By the thousands of individuals who have either already passed through its doors as temporary, invited or guest residents or by the many who remain eager to do so in future. By a wide range of related organisations, either other residence centres, art academies, individual ceramic studios, conference administrations, biennials or symposia that see the EKWC as the role model on which to base their own practice. And by theoreticians, critics, journalists and politicians who have each come to recognise the leading position of the EKWC and its lasting theoretical impact in countless articles, journals, reports, catalogues and all manner of other published material.

That the centre may be regarded so highly within just one of these groups would make it worthy of further attention. That it is acknowledged equally significantly across multiple fields makes it clearly a special case indeed. In keeping with an organisation so highly regarded an extensive degree of documentation exists which recognises the work undertaken by this centre. What though is apparent throughout this recognition is that it has remained by and large precisely that. A recognition of the Centre's standing rather than the offering of a clear understanding into the reasoning behind its success.

Demystified: The European Ceramic Workcentre as Centre of Excellence deciphers for the first time the specific and fundamental reasoning for the successes behind this world leader. It describes the complex system of operation that exists throughout the entire organisation, a system that has matured and been refined over the course of the previous four decades. It explains how such an ideal working environment has developed, why this is unique to the EKWC, and why such excellence in practice is difficult to find in other related organisations around the world.

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