Common Ground. A Critical Reader. Venice Biennale of Architecture 2012 | David Chipperfield, Kieran Long, Shumi Bose | 9788831714358

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Common Ground. A Critical Reader

Venice Biennale of Architecture 2012

Auteur:David Chipperfield, Kieran Long, Shumi Bose

Uitgever:Rizzoli

ISBN: 978-88-3171-435-8

  • Hardcover
  • Engels
  • 352 pagina's
  • 14 sep. 2012

"Common Ground," the title British architect David Chipperfield chose for the 13th edition of the Venice Architecture Biennale, suggests a generous and expansive, if somewhat tame, strategy for organizing what still ranks as the most important architecture exhibition in the world.

And in fact that feel-good two-word phrase, defined in endlessly elastic terms by Chipperfield and his curatorial team, has allowed him to use this biennale to bind together a number of themes that have dramatically reemerged in architecture in the last three or four years.

"Common Ground," the title British architect David Chipperfield chose for the 13th edition of the Venice Architecture Biennale, suggests a generous and expansive, if somewhat tame, strategy for organizing what still ranks as the most important architecture exhibition in the world. And in fact that feel-good two-word phrase, defined in endlessly elastic terms by Chipperfield and his curatorial team, has allowed him to use this biennale to bind together a number of themes that have dramatically reemerged in architecture in the last three or four years.

The exhibition focuses in particular on the city (the urban commons) and on history (the threads that connect generations of architects across time).

The approach surely appealed to Chipperfield in part as a way to bridge the gap between his own generation - he was born in 1953 - and that of the architects now in their 20s and 30s. Many of those younger architects are eager to tackle issues related to urbanism and public space in their work and are busy reinterpreting the postmodern architecture of the 1970s and '80s, which brought history, memory and the quotation of older styles back into the architectural conversation.

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