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Arquitectura Viva 159. Density Matters. World-Class Compact Living | Arquitectura Viva magazine

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Arquitectura Viva 159. Density Matters

World-Class Compact Living

Publisher:Arquitectura Viva

  • Paperback
  • English, Spanish
  • 96 Pages
  • Jan 13, 2014

This issue of Arquitectura Viva magazine begins with an issue including six works by international architects in which density plays a leading role.

Without density, there can be no urban sustainability. But in the complex geography of globalization, density is no longer linked exclusively to the Mediterranean city, informal agglomerations, or social housing. The concept has stretched to even include residential models of the kind formerly related to the sprawl of the green city, and which tended to be associated with high purchasing power. Six works illustrate this transformation: the Iceberg apartments by JDS in the Danish city of Aarhus; a high-tech residential building by Richard Rogers in London; a stacked housing development by Ofis outside Paris; twin towers by Ma Yansong near Toronto; a compact prism packed with balconies in São Paulo by Isay Weinfeld; and the compact and hybrid Sten Holl block in Chengdu.

Complementing this selection of projects in different parts of the world are a critical article on OMA's latest icon, De Rotterdam, and an insightful text where Norman Foster explains the advantages of the compact city.

The Art/Culture section offers an essay on Rafael Moneo on the occasion of a major retrospective of his work, through drawings from his studio, at the Barrié de la Maza Foundation in La Coruña, as well as a critique on the latest project of David Chipperfield: the Jumex Museum in Mexico City.

This issue of Arquitectura Viva magazine begins with an issue including six works by international architects in which density plays a leading role.

Without density, there can be no urban sustainability. But in the complex geography of globalization, density is no longer linked exclusively to the Mediterranean city, informal agglomerations, or social housing. The concept has stretched to even include residential models of the kind formerly related to the sprawl of the green city, and which tended to be associated with high purchasing power. Six works illustrate this transformation: the Iceberg apartments by JDS in the Danish city of Aarhus; a high-tech residential building by Richard Rogers in London; a stacked housing development by Ofis outside Paris; twin towers by Ma Yansong near Toronto; a compact prism packed with balconies in São Paulo by Isay Weinfeld; and the compact and hybrid Sten Holl block in Chengdu.

Complementing this selection of projects in different parts of the world are a critical article on OMA's latest icon, De Rotterdam, and an insightful text where Norman Foster explains the advantages of the compact city.

The Art/Culture section offers an essay on Rafael Moneo on the occasion of a major retrospective of his work, through drawings from his studio, at the Barrié de la Maza Foundation in La Coruña, as well as a critique on the latest project of David Chipperfield: the Jumex Museum in Mexico City.

To continue, the magazine inaugurates its monographic technical dossier section by focussing on construction with wood, presenting an article, a selection of systems, and details on five projects: a school in France by Vincent Parreira, with its wooden lattice; a cultural center in the Netherlands by Korteknie Stuhlmacher, with panels of cross laminated timber; a residence in Belgium by 51N4E, clad with thermohardened wood; a shelter in the Alps by Gramazio & Kohler, fabricated with robotized systems; and a house in Galicia by Carlos Quintáns, executed with a light frame.

Finally, apropos the crisis in the Panama Canal expansion, Fernando Valderrama analyzes contracting strategies in Spanish public works.

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